I added a JSON feed to my site. If you have a Jekyll blog, it’s as easy as adding this template from Alexandre Vallières-Lagacé to the root directory of your Jekyll blog and adding one line to the file where your blog’s <head> is defined.

I made one change to the title attribute to accommodate my note posts (which don’t have titles):

"title": {% if post.layout != "note" %}{{ post.title | jsonify }}{% else %}""{% endif %}

Here’s my JSON feed; this is what it looks like in Maxime Vaillancourt’s JSON Feed Viewer.

My post-via-email setup is working for notes and photos. (I posted this via email.)

I added a new note format (a layout in Jekyll terminology) for posting links and short entries with just a few lines of text. I’m also working on a way to post to a Jekyll blog via email. It’ll probably be limited to notes and photos.

I manage all of my personal projects and tasks in OmniFocus, but recently I was working on a larger project and realized it would be nice to have a more visual Kanban-style view of the projects instead of just the list of tasks in OmniFocus. Trello has a great (and free) iPad app that allows this sort of visualization.

I didn’t want to type all of my tasks again just to get them into Trello, so I wanted to automate transferring the tasks from OmniFocus to Trello. Since I only use OmniFocus on my iPad and since Workflow has actions for both OmniFocus and Trello, Workflow seemed like the ideal solution. (My solution actually requires not just Workflow but also Pythonista, as a small Python script was the best way I could accomplish part of this process.)

Rather than write what would be a very long and probably boring description, I prepared a screencast to demonstrate the workflow.

Get the apps, workflow and script

Panic makes great apps (I use a few of them). I hate that this happened to them, but you have to admire their transparency and openness about this situation.

 The Case of the Stolen Source Code