daylilies
 Jun 27, 2017 20:27
Experimenting with depth of field blur in Affinity Photo for iPad

I’ve been using Day One since February 17, 2014, and I have 5,916 entries (although the majority of those are automated entries) in four journals. I’ve recorded everything from my daily routine to job changes to vacations in it.

When I read about the new premium service, I subscribed right away. It’s a valuable service that I use every day, and I want to see it continue for many years into the future, so it’s definitely worth the cost to me. It’s also a rock-solid, dead-simple way to keep a journal, and I strongly recommend it if you’re looking for such an app. The premium service is $49.99/year, but right now it’s discounted to $34.99 for new subscribers and $24.99 for current users of Day One 2.0.

I took this video on May 25, 2017 while taking off from Norfolk International Airport (ORF). This one is a little longer than the other two takeoff videos I’ve posted, but there’s a good view across the water toward the end of the video. (The clouds and sky are nice, too.)

I added a JSON feed to my site. If you have a Jekyll blog, it’s as easy as adding this template from Alexandre Vallières-Lagacé to the root directory of your Jekyll blog and adding one line to the file where your blog’s <head> is defined.

I made one change to the title attribute to accommodate my note posts (which don’t have titles):

"title": {% if post.layout != "note" %}{{ post.title | jsonify }}{% else %}""{% endif %}

Here’s my JSON feed; this is what it looks like in Maxime Vaillancourt’s JSON Feed Viewer.

My post-via-email setup is working for notes and photos. (I posted this via email.)